Study – Islamic Architecture in the Malay Peninsula Part 6 – Post Modern Revivalism

This is the last part of the Islamic Architecture in the Malay Peninsula series of articles and after wrapping the series up, I will Insya Allah start on the series about my recent trip to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. I would like to apologize as well for the lack of post these few weeks…I guess I had too much things going on here and considering this and that it takes much of my mind. I have some free time now, and on with the article!

Post Modern Revivalism simply means the language of architecture that doesn’t fit into the modern style architecture. This kind of architecture follows traditional Muslim architecture but with modern methods of buildings, easier access of foreign skills and decoration as well as modern materials.

Author - Spirits Ahmad Rithauddin

 Sultan Salahudin Abdul Aziz Mosque in Shah Alam, Malaysia

There are two kinds in this style that is – 1) Foreign Revivalism and, 2) Vernacular Revivalism. Foreign Revivalism means the architecture follows foreign style. In this style you can find features such as Sahns (middle courtyard), different foreign styles of domes as well as minarets, Iwans (Persian gateways) and floorplans following traditional Islamic Middle Eastern or Central Asian styles. The Vernacular Revivalism follows local traditional architecture style and features tiered roofs, square floorplans and traditional materials such as timber. This style is free from any influences of foreign Middle Eastern or Central Asian style (this style is actually used in my village’s mosque)

Al-Azim Mosque in Malacca, Malaysia

This style uses modern materials in building of the mosques – concrete with steel ribbed domes, covered with imported tiles with opulent foreign style decoration. Vernacular Revivalism, though uses the same modern materials, uses materials closer to local styles – woods such as timber and decorations of made by the craftsmen of the local people.

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