Imagining Islamic Aesthetics #5 – Islamic Ceramics

For today’s edition of Imagining Islamic Aesthetics, we will be looking into the colourful world of Islamic Ceramics. Throughout Islamic history, ceramics have been a great part of its art, usage ranging  from daily items such as plates, jars to architectural features such as Muqarnas, friezes and wall coverings.

The Muslims had done some innovations towards ceramic making. Techniques such as Tin-opacified glazing were invented by the Muslims, as well as creating some of the most impressive types of ceramics such as those produced in Iznik.

Albarello with fleur-de-lys decoration. Earthenware with transparent glaze, underglaze painted. Syria, first half of the 14th century.

© Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikimedia Commons

Part of an architectural frieze. Earthenware with moulded and painted decoration under transparent glaze and lustre glaze, early 13th century. From Kashan, Iran.

Dish with fish of the ladjvardina (“cobalt”) type. Earthenware with stain and gilded decoration, coloured opacified glaze, overglaze painted, Iran, late 13th century-early 14th century.

© Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikimedia Commons

Mihrab. Earthenware with moulded and painted decoration under transparent glaze and lustre glaze, early 14th century. From Kashan, Iran.

Ceramic tile depicting an elephant. Iran. Original work of art: late 12th century


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